Dispatches from the DC Enviro Film Fest

TSUNA2_120317_054

Photo: Bruce Guthrie / DCEFF

When the Environmental Film Festival in the Nation's Capital kicked off 20 years ago, it was attended by 1,200 people. Now in its 20th anniversary, the festival draws crowds of over 30,000 at venues around the city. This year's festival which wrapped up last weekend was the biggest yet: 180 films; environmental leaders and big name filmmakers like Ken Burns; packed movie houses around the city. We saw only a small fraction of the movies, but even these few generated lots of exciting discussion. Here’s a run-down of what we saw:

 

Revenge of the Electric Car

 

Synopsis: Large automakers (GM, Nissan) and small upstarts (Tesla, Greg Abbott) alike roll out their electric vehicle offerings in the face of dwindling oil supplies and a fluctuating economy. The film focuses on the leadership of these companies, their unique, sometimes over-the-top personalities and their reasons for betting their chips on electric vehicles.

Take Home Message: It was neat to see former GM CEO Bob Lutz, long known for producing gas-guzzlers, embrace the Chevy Volt as his company’s crown jewel. Panelist after the film explained that Revenge captures a specific moment in time and that battery and alternative fuel technology is moving at an even faster pace than the movie portrays. Ultimately, though, the design of our cities will be more central to the future of mobility than the design of our cars.

EarthShare members working on the issue: Institute for Transportation and Development Policy (Mark Gorton kicks off “Re-thinking the Automobile” in Delhi); NRDC (Broad coalition shows electric cars can bring relief at pump); Environmental Defense Fund (Timeline: cars and the environment).

 

Cape Spin

 

Synopsis: A proposed wind farm off Cape Cod, Massachusetts (Cape Wind) sets off a firestorm of local and national political debate, legal wrangling, media coverage and strange bedfellows for and against the project. A case study of American politics in action, the film gives each side of the debate equal coverage, revealing the difficulty of reaching consensus on environmental and energy issues.

Take Home Message: It’s important to have good communication with local people when planning energy projects. Other coastal states around the U.S. are considering their own projects – will they be as contentious as Cape Wind was? Meanwhile, Europe churns out energy from its own 53 offshore wind farms.

EarthShare members working on the issue: Oceana (Why We Believe in Offshore Wind); Sierra Club Foundation (Sierra Club Applauds Opening of Leasing Process for Offshore Wind).

 

Surviving Progress

 

Synopsis: Most of us take the word “progress” for granted, particularly technological and economic progress. This film, produced by Martin Scorsese, proposes that conventional notions of progress are actually putting us on a collision course with environmental disaster. Based on Ronald Wright’s best-selling book, A Short History of Progress, the film is grand in scope and visually stunning.

Take Home Message: The technological solutions that we create to address environmental problems often cause new problems. In the end, the most important changes should come not from technological innovation, but changes to our cultural values. Start by asking yourself what the most important things in your life are (loved ones, strong communities, health, purpose) and build solutions from there.

EarthShare members working on the issue: Friends of the Earth (Global coalition calls for oversight of synthetic biology); Earthjustice (Engineering an Environmental Disaster); Physicians for Social Responsibility (Technology and toxics).

 

The Tsunami and the Cherry Blossom

 

Synopsis: Shortly following Japan’s devastating 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster, director Lucy Walker travels to the ravaged Tohoku region to interview survivors about their relationship to the country’s steadfast symbol: the cherry blossom.

Take Home Message: Nature’s persistent character provides solace for those suffering under even the most horrible circumstances. To hear survivors talk about their personal reflections on cherry blossoms while in the midst of tragedy captures the sorrow and remarkable tenacity of the human spirit.

EarthShare members working on the issue: American Forests (Signs of Spring); Restore America’s Estuaries (Storms, Tsunamis, Coastal Wetlands, and Carbon); Arbor Day Foundation (Japanese Flowering Cherry).

 

Waking the Green Tiger: The Rise of the Green Movement in China

Synopsis: A film crew and domestic journalists visit rural villages in China to help local people find their voice in the fight against dam projects. The film also looks at the history of environmentalism in China from its dark days under Mao’s Zedong’s Cultural Revolution to today's glimmers of democratic protest.

Take Home Message: Stories about environmental issues in China tend to focus on global competition for energy resources (where China’s growth is often used as a scapegoat for inaction elsewhere), factory conditions or pollution. Waking the Green Tiger interviews some of the strongest voices in China’s domestic environmental movement, providing a different and hopeful perspective on the country’s challenges. Also shows how closely cultural survival is linked to environmental concerns in places like China’s wild and beautiful west.

EarthShare members working on the issue: Rainforest Alliance (Community Forestry in China); American Rivers (Making Hydropower Dams Work Better); The Jane Goodall Institute (Beijing: Dr. Goodall’s Gombe 50 Tour of Asia).

 

A Fierce Green Fire: The Battle for a Living Planet

 

Synopsis: Providing much-needed historical and global context to today’s environmental challenges, A Fierce Green Fire charts the origins of the modern environmental movement along with its major players, its setbacks, victories and future challenges.

Take Home Message: Whether it was the Sierra Club working to prevent dams in the Grand Canyon or homeowners fighting for their family’s health during the Love Canal crisis, environmental activists have always had to work against great forces to get their voices heard. Still, contemporary issues like global warming and the rapid loss of biodiversity present an even greater imperative to work together for the future of the planet. Inspiring.

EarthShare members working on the issue: Everyone!

 

Please share!



TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00e554936bef88340168e8feac03970c

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Dispatches from the DC Environmental Film Festival:

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

car hire perth

I like the take home message in "revenge of the electric car". I would also agree it’s important to have good communication with local people when planning energy projects. In this way, people and the government have uniformity for the improvement of their areas.

EarthShare

Hi Michael,

Thanks for your question. It really depends on the film. Many of the movies we saw are still in production and are still making their way around the festival circuit. Some you can already get on DVD (Waking the Green Tiger, for instance). Your best bet would be to visit the film's website to learn more.

Michael Funke

Can these films be seen in other cities?

Post a comment

Comments are moderated, and will not appear on this weblog until the author has approved them.

If you have a TypeKey or TypePad account, please Sign In.

EARTH SAVING NEWS